The Jaguar E Type and Beauty

jaguar-e-type-cows

How The Appeal of the E Type Never Fades

One of our customers sent us a great photo of our silver Jaguar E Type hired for their wedding. It seems the appreciation of the fine lines of the Jaguar is not exclusive to our species. This got me thinking about the seemingly universal beauty of the E Type Jag. Customers returning from their travels almost invariably report of the attention that the car attracts wherever they go. It seems this classic car is ingrained in the heritage of British heritage. In fact I fancy if you listen very closely to the engine note, you can just about make out the Dambusters theme in the background.

Enzo Ferrari famously declared the car the most beautiful car ever made on its launch in Geneva in 1961. The New York Museum of Modern Art, MoMA added an E Type to their collection in 1996. In a survey by the Telegraph newspaper of the most beautiful cars ever made, the Jaguar E-Type trounced the opposition by a huge margin, polling four times as many votes as its nearest rival.

Certainly, driving the car past school kids who are unlikely to have any idea of the identity of the car always seems to result in enthusiastic whooping. Clearly the E Type stands out to a generation more familiar with today’s more angular colour-coded body designs. It is so very obviously from a different era.

Beauty is proverbially in the eye of the beholder but there are some cases where the subjective almost seems to become objective. While I am unaware of any large cohort, double blind studies into bovine automotive attraction, I would not be surprised if we were to find that the Jaguar E Type is favoured by 8 out of 10 cows that express a preference.

Jaguar E Type v Modern Electronics

Our silver E Type chalked up another score for classic car technology when it returned from a hire the other day. The plucky Jaguar faithfully transported the customer across the country to his wedding and the happy couple onward for their honeymoon. After a journey of many hundreds of miles, the happy couple returned to us with a broad smile on their faces. The one component that had failed? The 21st century CD audio system.

After some diagnosis to determine if the head unit could be revived it was declared unserviceable and a replacement located and purchased. This was duly fitted to the car, with a friendly blue display to match the upholstery. Now the car has now been brought up to date with an auxiliary input and a USB port for you to plug your new-fangled smartphone thingy-me-jig into.

The sound quality? You are sitting next to a 4.2 litre roaring beast of an engine with the wind blowing around your head. Sound quality? Pah!

Silver Jaguar Delights With Longer Legs

Silver Jaguar E-Type in Brimpsfield

The winter is a less than ideal time for classic car hire and we take the opportunity to take the cars of the road to make improvements. This year we decided to treat our silver car to a full differential rebuild and in the process we restored the original ratio which had been modified by a previous owner. We worked with a leading expert in the field of classic Jaguar differential rebuilds to carry out the task and were very pleased with the quality of the work carried out.

The result has been fantastic. Fourth gear of the five speed box corresponds in ratio to top gear on the original car and the fifth gear now provides taller gearing for more relaxed motorway use. The longer legs make the car even more of a delight to drive with the additional benefit of lower fuel consumption and less wear on the engine. We think this was well worth the investment.

Our Red Jaguar E-Type on BBC’s Doctor Who

Our red Jaguar E Type on Dr Who

“Doctor Who” scarcely needs any introduction as the longest running and most successful science fiction TV series of all time. The show has aired weekly in over 50 countries and is in the top 5 grossing titles for BBC Worldwide.

The “Doctor Who” team at the BBC were looking for the ultimate dream car for the Doctor to tempt Rory and Amy to give up their life of time-travelling adventures for an idyllic existance back here on Earth. After considering the options, Classic Motoring’s red Jaguar E-Type was selected as the car best-suited to the task and we were happy to supply her for this episode of Doctor Who, “The God Complex”.

We were on set for the day to assist with movements, valetting and any other queries that the crew had and it is a real pleasure to watch the slickness of the operation along with the camaraderie and teamwork. It is easy to see why the BBC enjoys the worldwide reputation that it has.

You will have to watch the episode to find out how it all ends. Very moving!

Summer Evening by the River

Our Jaguars tend to be busy girls over the summer but every so often we manage to steal away for a little drive ourselves and this weekend we took a drive out to a pub we hadn’t tried before. The Boat Inn at Ashleworth is a wonderful traditional inn by the side of the River Severn north of Gloucester which has been in the same family for over 350 years.

Ashleworth Tithe Barn

Ashleworth Tithe Barn

The drive out there takes you on pleasant winding roads through surprisingly undulating landscape for the Severn Vale. It was a fine evening, so the hood was down to enjoy the wind in the hair and the burble of the engine. After an all too short drive, we pass the beautiful Ashleworth Court and the imposing Tithe Barn, which is altogether too picturesque not to pull over for a photo.

Ashleworth Court

Ashleworth Court

A short drive later we arrive at our destination. The land on which the Boat Inn stands is surrounded by a flood bank, closed at the road way by an extremely sturdy flood gate. The bank also doubles as an extremely pleasant spot to sit and watch the river go by.

The bar itself is extremely cosy, with a friendly and welcoming local crowd. Indeed the bar is of a size that everyone can share the same conversation. More seating is available outside under a covered but we opt for a table on the river bank. The setting is idyllic. Too bad they don’t serve food, but we shall be back nevertheless.